Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power

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Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power

Author: Rachel Maddow
Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
Copyright: 2012
Pages: 288
Cover Price: $ 35.00

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"One of my favorite ideas is, never to keep an unnecessary soldier," Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1792. Neither Jefferson nor the other Found­ers could ever have envisioned the modern national security state, with its tens of thousands of "privateers"; its bloated Department of Homeland Security; its rust­ing nuclear weapons, ill-maintained and difficult to dismantle; and its strange fascination with an unproven counterinsurgency doctrine.      Written with bracing wit and intelligence, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that we've drifted away from America's original ideals and become a nation weirdly at peace with perpetual war, with all the financial and human costs that entails.  

To understand how we've arrived at such a dangerous place, Maddow takes us from the Vietnam War to today's war in Afghanistan, along the way exploring the disturbing rise of executive authority, the gradual outsourcing of our war-making capabilities to private companies, the plummeting percentage of American families whose children fight our constant wars for us, and even the changing fortunes of G.I. Joe.      

She offers up a fresh, unsparing appraisal of Reagan's radical presidency. Ultimately, she shows us just how much we stand to lose by allowing the priorities of the national security state to overpower our political discourse.      Sensible yet provocative, dead serious yet seri­ously funny, Drift will reinvigorate a "loud and jangly" political debate about how, when, and where to apply America's strength and power -- and who gets to make those decisions.

Background Information

Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, founded the Democratic-Republican Party and was the third President. After the French proved themselves unable to recover their Indonesian territory after World War II, the United States gradually took on their role and became mired in a land war. Afghanistan was invaded in 2001 as a result of the refusal of its Taliban government to reject Osama Bin Laden. Ronald Reagan launched the United States into a military buildup contest with the Soviet Union that the Russians ultimately couldn't sustain.